Classic Club #1174 held at Sky View Bar & Restaurant

puerto galera classic club scandi divers resort

Big thanks to all the gents from the Puerto Galera Classic Club, who joined us at Classic Club the Sky View Bar & Restaurant for an afternoon of delicious food and drinks, on the 1174th Classic Club!

Scroll the gallery below and click an image to enlarge

Sharks now protected no matter whose waters they swim in

UN shark protection convention

It’s been a good week for beleaguered sharks. A cross-border conservation pact signed by 126 countries this week promises for the first time to extend extra protection to sharks and several other migratory species, whichever countries they stray into.

Among the biggest winners at the global Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals(CMS) were whale sharks: the world’s largest fish. They are a vulnerable species and their population has been falling. Governments added whale sharks to appendix I of the convention, promising to protect them domestically from killing or capture, and to safeguard their habitats.

Conservationists welcomed the move because it means whale sharks will finally be protected at offshore “hotspots” to which they migrate, including Madagascar, Mozambique, Peru and Tanzania.

Several other sharks made it on to appendix II, which obliges countries within a species’ migratory range to collaborate on measures to protect them, for example by regulating fishing or banning finning.

International cooperation

Conservationists particularly welcomed the new status for blue sharks. “They’re the most highly fished sharks in the world, with 20 million caught around the world each year, but they’re also the most migratory, so they’re vulnerable to fisheries everywhere,” says Matt Collis of the International Fund for Animal Welfare. “This puts pressure on countries to commit to international protection.”

Other sharks sharing in the same new protections included dusky sharks, angelsharks, white-spotted wedgefish and the bizarrely named common guitarfish.

As an additional bonus, Sri Lanka, Ecuador, Benin and Brazil joined the shark memorandum of understanding, an ad hoc agreement already signed by 41 countries to coordinate protection for sharks. Collis says the addition of Brazil is particularly significant, as it has a large part to play in protection of many species of shark.

Grand Opening of the Sky View Bar & Restaurant

sky view bar and restaurant puerto galera

The Grand Opening is by invite only for friends, family and VIPs, and will be featuring a live band, fireworks display and free buffet. It promises to be a great night’s entertainment for all, and we look forward to ‘wetting the roof’ before opening the Sky View Bar & Restaurant to the public.

The Sky View Bar & Restaurant will be offering a delightful selection of international cuisine and drinks and cocktails, all to be enjoyed whilst taking in the breathtaking beauty of Big La Laguna Bay.

Winner of the PADI Women’s Dive Day Video Competition!

PADI Women's Dive Day 2017 winner

Big thanks to everyone involved in our 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day event! We’re very proud of all the girls involved, and the great video they produced! Special thanks to Richard Morante for shooting and editing the video.

Apparently PADI agrees!

Our Sky View Restaurant is now open!

skybar restaurant at scandi divers resort puerto galera

We are proud to announce the opening of the Sky View restaurant at Scandi Divers Resort. Enjoy delicious international dishes while soaking in the incredible view of Big La Laguna Bay. It’s also the perfect spot for sundowner cocktails!

We hope to see you there soon.

Three Things to Know About the Coral Triangle, the Ocean’s Biodiversity Hot Spot

the coral triangle philippines

At more than a billion acres of ocean, the Coral Triangle is one of the world’s biggest and most important marine regions.

The Triangle is a billion-acre ocean region controlled by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste. Unlike some other coral-rich areas like the Great Barrier Reef, the Coral Triangle isn’t a household name. But it’s importance to Southeast Asia and the world’s oceans can’t be downplayed: The region encompasses a full 30 percent of the world’s coral and has the highest diversity of corals and fishes in the world. It’s a place to know—especially if you’re concerned about conservation and coastal communities, which many are.

Here are three need-to-know facts about the Coral Triangle:

It’s been called “the Amazon of the ocean”

Like the Amazon rainforest in comparison to other forest regions, the Coral Triangle is home to diversity found nowhere else in the reef system. More than 75 percent of the world’s coral species–over 600 species–live in the Triangle, and the area contains more than 30 percent of all the world’s coral reefs.

But the coral is only the start of the diversity in this living system. “The Coral Triangle has more coral reef fish diversity than anywhere else in the world,” writes the World Wildlife Federation. Of the 6,000 currently known species of reef fish, 37 percent of the world’s coral reef fish live in parts of the Triangle. Two hundred and thirty-five of those species are found nowhere else.

Six out of the world’s seven marine turtles live in regions of the Coral Triangle. So do aquatic mammals like blue whales, sperm whales and dolphins and endangered species like dugongs. The list is long. In fact, writes the WWF, the criteria used to define the Coral Triangle relied on high species diversity–higher than that of nearby reefs in Australia and Fiji.

It’s a stunning array of diversity that scientists from the Smithsonian Institution and elsewhere are working hard to understand–even as it might be fading away.

Ghizo Solomon Islands

Jurgen Freund World Wildlife Fund

It may be where coral reefs began

“The theory is that this is where coral reefs started,” says naturalist Chris Cook in the National Geographic documentary below. Today, the Triangle is the center of diversity for ocean life, and research in reef sciences has suggested that it was the historic point of origin for many coral species as well as many of the species that live there.

Paleontologists are studying ocean in the Triangle to get a sense of what the underwater past looked like. “The ancient diversity of the Coral Triangle can tell us much about how life has adapted to changing conditions in the past, and how life may well adapt again in the future,” writes Britain’s National History Museum.

Among the abundant species Cook and his colleagues observed recently: the cuttlefish, a species which itself has been around for more than 500 million years. “It’s hard to explain. You have to see it,” Cook says. “It’s a mollusc. It’s related to a clam. And it just displays such intelligence.”

Enter the Coral Triangle

It’s in danger exactly because of its abundance

Like reefs everywhere else on the planet, the Triangle is in critical danger because of human-produced factors. It’s in danger from localized threats like cyanide fishing for rare aquarium fish that live in its waters. This practice damages fish communities and the surrounding environment. But it’s also in danger because of huge threats, like anthropogenic climate change, which is warming the seas as they become more acidic, resulting in conditions where many species of coral can’t live.

On top of that, coral bleaching and white syndrome are immediate threats to many species of coral that dominate the Triangle–the Acropora corals.  “In the next century, maybe all coral reef researchers will be paleontologists,” one coral researcher said to the Natural History Museum.

But there’s hope that parts of the Coral Triangle may be refuges for marine life once again. “High levels of biodiversity, coupled with fast rates of growth and recovery, put many Coral Triangle ecosystems in a favorable position to survive climate change,” writes the World Wildlife Fund.

The Coral Triangle: Nursery of the Seas

PADI Women’s Dive Day 2017 Official Video

padi womens dive day 2017 scandi divers resort puerto galera

At last we are delighted to reveal our official video for the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event of 2017 at Scandi Divers Resort.

We had an excellent turnout, and hope the event will continue to grow each year!

PADI Womens Dive Day 2017 at Scandi Divers Resort – Video part 1

padi womens dive day 2017 scandi divers resort puerto galera

We were really pleased to see a great turn out for this year’s PADI Womens Dive Day event at Scandi Divers Resort, and the ladies had a whale of a time!

Part 2 of the video coming soon!

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook.